Records from Columbia

A Camp Meeting at Pumpkin Center

January 15, 2016
By joycejohnston

After You Get What You Want You Don’t Want It

December 31, 2015
By joycejohnston

More than 20 years after this was recorded, the Dardenelle Trio put their own spin on After You Get What You Want You Don’t Want It.

After You’ve Gone

December 29, 2015
By joycejohnston

Performed by Gene Krupa and his Orchestra, featuring Roy Eldridge on trumpet.

Air Mail Special

January 10, 2016
By joycejohnston

As Long As I Live


By joycejohnston

As You Desire Me

January 5, 2016
By joycejohnston

Banana Oil

December 31, 2015
By joycejohnston

Totally charming!

Black Coffee

January 5, 2016
By joycejohnston

Blue Blood Blues

July 31, 2018
By joycejohnston

Blue Moon – Beginning

March 12, 2016
By joycejohnston

By Hart & Rogers. This recording is a part of a series of jam session albums for Columbia, which were made between 1953 and 1956.

Blue Moon – Conclusion


By joycejohnston

Blue Skies

December 4, 2015
By joycejohnston

Performed by Count Basie and his Orchestra.

Boy Meets Horn

December 28, 2015
By joycejohnston

Cooking Breakfast for the One I Love

July 31, 2018
By joycejohnston

Dark Eyes

December 29, 2015
By joycejohnston

Performed by Gene Krupa Jazz Trio. This recording really showcases Krupa’s skills.

Dinah

August 7, 2018
By joycejohnston

Dixie

August 4, 2018
By joycejohnston

Flying Home

January 10, 2016
By joycejohnston

Funny, Dear, What Love Can Do

July 25, 2018
By joycejohnston

Good Morning Mr. Zip Zip Zip

November 28, 2015
By joycejohnston

Eugene Buckley was a pseudonym used by Columbia in issuing some records actually performed by Arthur Fields. This is one of those records.

Grand Slam

January 10, 2016
By joycejohnston

His Spiritual Message – Part 1

February 21, 2020
By joycejohnston

This recording was made in 1931. It was released on 78 RPM disk in 1948, almost immediately following Gandhi’s assassination. While it may have been published before then, I cannot find any record of it being released when it was first recorded.

His Spiritual Message – Part 2


By joycejohnston

Honest and Truly

November 22, 2015
By joycejohnston

Beautiful label! Shiny!

How Hi the Fi – Beginnning

March 12, 2016
By joycejohnston

This recording is a part of a series of jam session albums for Columbia, which were made between 1953 and 1956.

How Hi the Fi – Conclusion


By joycejohnston

How Long Blues

December 4, 2015
By joycejohnston

Performed by Count Basie and his All American Rhythm Section.

I Found a New Baby

January 10, 2016
By joycejohnston

I’ll Say She Does

August 12, 2018
By joycejohnston

I’m Someone Who’s No One to You

November 22, 2015
By joycejohnston

I’m sorry I ain’t got it you could have it if I had it blues

April 5, 2017
By joycejohnston

It Came Upon a Midnight Clear

December 28, 2015
By joycejohnston

Jack and the Beanstalk – Part 1

January 19, 2020
By joycejohnston

Jack and the Beanstalk – Part 2


By joycejohnston

Jack and the Beanstalk – Part 3


By joycejohnston

Jack and the Beanstalk – Part 4


By joycejohnston

Jack and the Beanstalk – Part 5


By joycejohnston

Jack and the Beanstalk – Part 6


By joycejohnston

Jet Black Blues

July 31, 2018
By joycejohnston

K-K-K-Katy

November 28, 2015
By joycejohnston

Columbia issued this recording of Arthur Fields doing this popular WWI song, “K-K-K-Katy” under the pseudonym Eugene Buckley.

Kentucky Waltz

November 14, 2015
By joycejohnston

This bluegrass classic was Bill Monroe and his Bluegrass Boys most commercially successful recording, reaching number three on the US Country & Western charts in 1946.

La Mora Con Casquete

January 6, 2016
By joycejohnston

Last Day of School At Pumpkin Center

January 15, 2016
By joycejohnston

Leap Frog Blues

December 28, 2015
By joycejohnston

Let’s Dance


By joycejohnston

Lucille

August 12, 2018
By joycejohnston

Moonglow & Down South Camp Meetin’

March 12, 2016
By joycejohnston

One O’Clock Jump


By joycejohnston

Written by Count Basie. This version really swings.

Open the Door Richard

November 14, 2015
By joycejohnston

“Open the Door, Richard” began as a Vaudeville routine and had been recorded by Jack McVea, Count Basie and Dusty Fletcher before The Three Flames recorded it in 1947. It was their only hit, reaching the Billboard Best Seller chart on February 14, 1947. Their version lasted three weeks on the chart, peaking at number four. The song has had a lasting impact on American culture, with references popping up in everything from Looney Tunes cartoons to protests during the Civil Rights era. (See the Wikipedia article for details.) A Wikipedia entry can make a song seem too stuffy, too good for you, like a cup of broccoli. But “Open the Door, Richard” is a bowl of ice cream. Take a listen.

Ostrich Walk

December 29, 2015
By joycejohnston

Personnel: Bix Beiderbecke, cornet; Bill Rank, trombone; Don Murray, trombone; Doc Ryker, alto sax; Frankie Trumbauer, C melody sax; Izzy Riskin; Eddy Lang, guitar; Chauncey Morehouse, drums.

Originally issued on Okeh(40822). Composed by Original Dixieland Jazz Band.