Original Dixieland Jazz Band

Original Dixieland Jazz Band

The Original Dixieland Jazz Band

The Original Dixieland Jazz Band (originally called the “Original Dixieland Jass Band”) was the first band to record jazz commercially. They began recording in 1917; their hits included many songs that became jazz standards, including the recordings below. See Wikipedia for details.

The Recordings

Palesteena

 record label Group: Original Dixieland Jazz Band
Label: Victor Matrix Number: Victor (18717)
Record Type: Double sided 10 inch 78 RPM
Date Recorded: December 1, 1920
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Also known as “Lena from Palesteena,” this song was composed by band member J. Russel Robinson and was one of the most popular songs of 1920.

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Margie

 record label Group: Original Dixieland Jazz Band
Label: Victor Matrix Number: Victor (18717)
Record Type: Double sided 10 inch 78 RPM
Date Recorded: December 1, 1920
Listen:
Notes:

Margie was composed by vaudeville performer and pianist Con Conrad and ragtime pianist J. Russel Robinson, with lyrics by Benny Davis. The song is named for the five-year-old daughter of singer and songwriter Eddie Cantor. A jazz standard, it has been covered by zillions of people, including Bix Beiderbecke, Cab Calloway, Bing Crosby, Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, Johnny Mercer, Dave Brubeck and Ray Charles. Check out Brother Bones’ version, recorded almost 30 years after this one. This version is a medley of Margie and Singin’ the Blues.

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2 thoughts on “Original Dixieland Jazz Band”

  1. chris coleman says:

    I have a first printing of the Dixie jass band one-step.
    “that teasing rag” side a and
    Livery stable blues–fox trot on side b. #18255 along with original picture of band, also protected in original metal case.
    Any idea of worth???

    1. DownAndOut says:

      Chris – Much of it depends upon condition. That record, in excellent condition, could fetch $20 or $25 – maybe even $30, if you find the right buyer. It was recorded in May, 1917, so it will be 100 years old next spring. To have survived for that long in excellent condition is a feat! Thanks for writing!

      –Thomas

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